Twittering Tales #17: A Warm Welcome

twittering tales.pngTwittering Tales challenge is hosted by Kat Myrman at like mercury colliding… The goal is to write a twitter-length story, in 140 characters or less. You can see the challenge HERE. 🙂 I know it took me a lot of time to post, but here’s my story for this week’s prompt:

A Warm Welcome

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They were coming. He knew it meant guns, bombs and destruction. But he’ll try to welcome the aliens, show them there’s some good in humans.

(139 characters)

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Microfiction Challenge: The Red Tree

writingThis is my first time participating in Jane Dougherty’s Microfiction Challenge. When I saw the promt picture, by the artist Virginia Frances Sterret, I just had to make a story for it. I love it! 🙂 Just look how pretty it is:

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And now, here’s my story:

The Red Tree

Ayla had the magic beans and a plan.
Yes, she would have to defeat the giant, but she was ready for it. She had several tricks in her sleeve. With a wide smile on her face, she planted a bean in the ground. Ayla could already picture the gold and the jewels. No more hard work, no more rags, no more, no more…
It took just a few seconds for the tree to start growing. Did the ground move, or was it just her legs shaking?  Yes, the tree grew, but something wasn’t right.
A strange plant appeared before Ayla’s eyes, weak and wobbly. Its stalk was a dark, rotten red, all twisted and turned.

“You freed me,” the plant spoke. “So now, I will grant you three wishes.”

“Three wishes?” Ayla was confused. “But you’re supposed to take me up in the clouds, to the treasure.”

“Treasure in the clouds? I’ve never heard of such a thing…”

“Well, not exactly in the clouds… Anyway, I didn’t free you. I planted you,” Ayla was getting a bit annoyed. This was not a part of her plan. “And it’s genies who grant wishes. Or goldfish. Not trees.”

“That’s quite judgemental of you,” the plant sounded offended. “What do you know about trees, anyway?”

“I’m sorry…” Ayla sighed. “I’m just a bit surprised. Three wishes are a great deal!”

“I’m not sure I want to grant them anymore…”

“Oh, please!” Ayla wasn’t ready to give up on her dreams.

“Fine. What’s your first wish?” the plant sounded friendly again.

“Well, I want to be rich!”

“I try not to be prejudiced, but this is such a human thing to wish for. Riches. Always the riches. Unfortunately, I can’t help you with that.”

“Why not?”

“I’m just a tree! Money doesn’t grow on trees!”

“Well, what can you do?”

“I can grow fruit.”

A number of different fruits appeared. Yellow pears, blue grapes, red apples. Ayla sighed. It was obvious now that things don’t always turn out like the stories tell. She picked an apple, sat comfortably underneath the tree and tasted it. It was very good. She might never become rich, but she could at least make the best of what she had.

Six Sentence Story: A New World

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There is no place for her in the new world – he knows it as he kisses her brow, and she smiles, still half-asleep.

He listens to the clock tick, counting the last minutes of the life as he knows it. As he watched the old world go down in flames, he knew that the next one had to be made differently, perfectly, and people should stick to doing simple things in order not to mess everything up again with their imperfect ideas.

And she, she is a painter, an artist. As much as he loves her, he knows that imagination can only cause problems.

The Sunflower and the Worm

Image courtesy of Pixomar at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of Pixomar at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

“Why do you always hide in the ground?” the Sunflower asked the Worm.

“It is my home”, the Worm replied.

“Such a sad home it is, so dark and cold! I pity you for I spend my days proudly, facing the brilliant Sun.”

“No, it is I who pity you”, grumbled the Worm. “For the Sun blinds you and you can’t see that life isn’t always bright.”

“You envy me”, smiled the Sunflower.

“How could I envy you, when you have nowhere to hide?” asked the worm.

“What would I hide from? The world is so beautiful and full of splendour, so why hide when you can live?”

The Worm did not reply, but crawled into the ground, thinking how stupid the yellow flower was.

And so they lived, one in the sun and the other in the ground, but it was hard to say who truly lived in the light and who was in the dark. The world didn’t care, it just went on. Many sunflowers and worms lived before these two, and many more will live after them, each in their own way – the best way they know.